Vocabulary

End the Confusion! (3) At the end vs. In the end

These two little phrases are often confusing for students, the only difference is a tiny wee preposition! They are high frequency so you do need to know them properly. The explanations will show you when you need to use ‘at’ and when to use ‘in’. Do the exercise at the end ūüėČ to check you’ve got them crystal clear.

AT THE END

Meaning: in the final part of something, when something ends

Juan is going back to Chile at the end of June.

We all got a certificate at the end of the course.

There’s a lovely park at the end of the road.

The play was a great success. At the end (= when it finished) everybody stood up and cheered.

IN THE END

Meaning 1: finally, after a long time; 

We got lost walking around the city but in the end we managed to find our hotel again.

It rained all morning but the sun came out in the end and I was able to take the dog for a walk.

Meaning 2: after considering everything, after all

We didn’t win the tournament but in the end what’s important is that everybody¬†really enjoyed themselves.

“Try not to get so stressed¬†about your interview,” said Harry. “In the end it’s just an interview. If you don’t get the job, there will be others.”

Exercise

Fill the gaps with ‘at’ or ‘in’

1. We’re looking forward to going to Mexico _____ the end of May.

2. The huge shark was coming towards me and I screamed, but it was just a dream _____ the end.

3. The best part of the party was ____ the end when there was an amazing firework display.

4. _____ the end of the interview they offered Keira the job.

5. It wasn’t easy to choose a university but _____ the end Deborah decided on Glasgow.















Answers

  1. at
  2. in
  3. at
  4. at
  5. in
Vocabulary

End the Confusion (2): Lend or Borrow?

Cover_Twitter - End the Confusion!

LEND sth (TO sb)  / LEND sb sth

Meaning: Give something to somebody temporarily but then they have to return it.

Michael lent his computer to Charlie for the weekend.

Quick, can you lend me a pen?

I lent the money to Nicola! It wasn’t a gift! I’m expecting her to give it back.

 

BORROW sth (FROM sb)

Meaning: Take something temporarily that belongs to sb else with the intention of returning it.

That’s not Charlie’s computer. ¬†He’s borrowed it from Michael for the weekend.

Quick, can I borrow a pen?

Nicola’s not keeping the money. She’s just borrowing it from me.

TIP: ¬†Although the¬†prepositions TO and FROM are not always needed, by paying special attention to them, it will help you confuse ‘lend’ and ‘borrow’ less.

Exercise

Fill in the gaps with ‘borrow’ or ‘lend’ (in the correct form):

1. Can I _____ ten pounds? It’s urgent.
2. Can you _____ me ten pounds? ¬†It’s urgent.
3. If you’re not using your skateboard, can I _____ it?
4. I _____ your dictionary to John yesterday.¬†I hope you don’t mind.
5. You don’t need to buy the book. I’m sure you can _____ it from the library.
6. Is that your coat? No, I’ve _____ it from my sister.
7. I’m not going to _____ my brand new camera to Alan. No way!

8. Did you _____ my scissors? I can’t find them anywhere.















Answers1. borrow  2. lend  3. borrow  4. lent  5. borrow  6. borrowed  7. lend  8. borrow